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remedies that provide certain remedies for violations of those laws. some have suggested these legal protection should apply equally to drones and that they may be sufficient to alleviate any constitutional problems for any privacy concerns. in your view is this approach correct? what are the main differences between manned and unmanned aircraft as it relates to the protection of americans for their privacy concerns? >> we don't believe there are any federal statutes that would provide limits on drone surveillance in the united states. the privacy laws are very targeted to the approach the united states has taken to privacy and denting compass the surveillance drones can conduct and because of this we're actually advocating additional legislation on drone surveillance. the primary difference between and and unmanned vehicles, this has been brought up, drones are going to be able to conduct more surveillance. they are cheaper to fly, cheaper to maintain and able to conduct an incredible amount more surveillance and individuals to the surveillance and designed, built to design to carry
into treatment in the first place. there is 4 l's, liver, livelihood, lover or the law. those 4 things. liver, livelihood, lover and law. within those l's is when somebody shows up in my door, someone suffering, a family member suffering who brings somebody in. when it company ms to treat we know there is different types of treatment, there is evidence base treatment. there is good evidence for it, we do it. there is evidence free treatment, there is no evidence whatsoever and there is evidence proof treatment. one of those evidence proof treatment is incarceration treatment. there was an office inspection in general report and eventually matt case became supervisor for it. i have been involved in other places. treatment in custody doesn't work. flash incarceration does not work. as far as the treatment that do work for alcoholism, alcoholism is a chronic disease like diabetes. hypertension and emphysema. when we look at outcomes for chronic disease, a landmark study for the journal medical association in 1999, showed that results for treatments were no worse or better than any other chronic
really act as a good communicator and facilitator in the program from a law enforcement background. and the grant we get through public works really allows us to run effectively. >> great, thank you. >> [speaker not understood]. let me come on over here. what's your question? >> okay. [speaker not understood]. i've gotten three years of knowledge [speaker not understood]. my question is this. how am i going to get the police department, how am i going to get city council -- they're partially on board, but some of our people in public works are here today. how can i convey to them that i'm not a nut -- everybody here thinks i'm a nut because [speaker not understood]. how did they really take this seriously and realize that graffiti is a crime and it requires money and it requires attention from the officials, not just from covering graffiti? is there an answer? can you give me some sort of -- what's a good direction? >> [speaker not understood]. >> [speaker not understood]. basically the task force, they'll put together and try to convince the citizens something is happening, then i
into law. we will be taking that up with the "a-team." angela mcglowan, james toronto and doug schoen. our first guest is here to evaluate obama's middle east tour. today's focus on the enormous price on jordan as a result of the syrian civil war. joining me now is judith miller and quivered lifford may. it is a very big positive impression with this to her, if not a concrete result. >> it was an extraordinary tour. the israelis called it a thermo nuclear charm offensive. talk about a restart in a relationship that was crying out. basically the president figured out do you attract more bees with honey in a country like israel who did everything he had to do to put a relationship on cose. lou: wasn't he inconsistent to be talking about peace in the middle east? at the same time that he was threatening bashar al-assad and a wrong? >> yes, but they are both provocative. they are both belligerent. they are destabilizing forces and have been for years. he understands that the israelis are reliable allies, valuable allies in many ways. they are in a difficult neighborhood. th israelis, two years
of the law. so we are going by what is shown on the plans. certainly the board of appeals here in its hearing on this matter and considering all of the facts can consider items in that article and can consider the testimony by all of the parties here in making a decision. we are basing our decision on the plans that are given to us and that are there testifying to and this is what we are going to do and this is what they are going to build and that is what we are expecting them to build if they don't build that and if they exceed the scope, then we will have to review that and come in for a revision permit and may trigger the 317 requirement. >> and in your experience, in the planning department when you see the designs such as this one and you have the evidence that has been presented to us today, understanding what sort of the spirit of the law as well as the technical components and requirements of it, is this something that is of concern to the planning department? where we see the people, i mean, at least from my, what i am seeing, it does look like an effort to circomvent what is otherw
. in 2010, federal judge walker struck it down saying it violated the equal protection under the law. in a split decision, a three-judge panel of the circuit court of appeals upheld that ruling last february. setting the stage before the u.s. supreme court. this past valentine's day, gay couples demanded marriage licenses at san francisco city hall as they have every year since 2004. they were turned away. >> it affects us in so many ways in our every day life. what we want is to be treated fairly. >> scott: i spoke with lieutenant governor gavin newsom recently about what compelled him to take a leading role in the gay marriage debate nine years ago. >> thanks for having me. >> scott: take us back to 2004. the marriage licenses began to be issued in san francisco. you had just gotten into office. what got into you? >> i went to the state of the union. nancy pelosi made a terrible mistake by giving me her husband's ticket to watch the state of the union. i was listening to the issues of the day. abstinence and drug testing. he would fulfill his private commitments now made public to
to implement lawyer's law which consist of outpatient treatment. it was named after laura wilcox, a mental health worker who had been shot to death by a man who refused treatment. the county r remains the only county to implement the law. there have been other counties in los angeles county and other counties who are considering it. >> why have they not adopted the law. what is it about forced treatment and the consequences for an allowing refusing treatment. we have a panel who have a knowledge of this subject in some cases because of their professional endeavors and in some cases because of personal experiences and in some cases, both. let me introduce them. karen chen is an attorney manager for the san francisco public defenders office, kathy, whose son battled mental illness, can is a subject treatment expert for the medical center. danny is the associate director for the serial neeb breet program for the city of san diego. and san francisco chief of police. gary is a psychiatrist and laura's law advocate and eduardo vega of the mental health association of san francisco. let me start
. >> they will be mindful of the limited role as judges to interpret existing law. >> plus, legal analysis on how the issues might be viewed on the highest court in the land. stay tuned for the special coverage of gay marriage before the u.s. supreme court. captioning by vitac, underwritten by fireman's fund >>> good evening. i'm scott shafer. welcome to this week in northern california. next tuesday, more than four years after california voters approved proposition 8, the state's ban on same-sex marriage, it gets a hearing from the u.s. supreme court. it will hear arguments for the defense of marriage act known as doma. we discuss the issues before the u.s. supreme court. it's the final stop on a long and winding legal road. let's begin with a look at how it all started. the week of valentine's day, 2004, newly elected san francisco mayor gavin newsom, boldly, some said recklessly orders to grant marriage licenses to same-sex couples. >> we reignited a fundamental debate. >> scott: outside city hall, gays and lesbians lines up around the block. about 4,000 couples tied the knot. it was not to last. at the
-paying position and if they went to law school they go to corporate law and may be bored to tears but want to do it for five to ten years to get the money to then be able to do their passion and that is the difference. when i wrote passages in the 1970s, the most famous business book and remains today what color is your parachute and the thesis was starch out following your passion. who can afford to do that as of 25-year-old who has finished college? they have to work and get some -- takes a decade to take -- pay off those college loans unless they came from a wealthy family. the other thing that i think is a big advance is the blue regeneration which was the generation that inherited the feminist revolution was 80% white. the generation of young people today is far more diversified and there are a lot of young african-american, asian-american, indian american, hispanics who voted for obama or very much responsible for the reelection of obama and are helping to mentor younger poor women which were left out of the first feminist revolution. poor women really didn't have a lot to do for them or e
fought for so long in the justice. the decision was law of the land. equal justice under law. >> when a supreme court decided the gideon case, they really brought light to that phrase. it doesn't matter if you are rich, it doesn't matter if you are poor, you get the same equal chance. >> just look at what happened to gideon. the supreme court didn't set gideon free but it gave him a fair trial with a competent attorney. >> not guilty. >> clarence earl gideon was a free man. the man who won a landmark supreme court case went to live a normal living with a job pumping gas. >> when i read where it says equal justice under law, i'm very inspired by that. i'm very comforted by that. but i know a lot of people are treated unfairly. i see it as something encouraging but i don't see it yet. >> it's written into constitution and established into the goal for society to reach for and live up to. people will fall short, rights can be ignored or even trampled. with nothing more than a pencil and knowledge. >> if you know your rights you can protect your rights. if you don't know your rights you
. then because we have no money, we reach out to the local bar. law firms like jim's law firm or chris's law firm help us in situations where we are trying to establish counsel and reinforce. we get over a thousand cases a year. from that first request we are usually able to take it down to about half. many of them who are writing to us are not claiming to be innocent. they are probably claiming that their prison conditions are inadequate and they are probably right. they might be claiming that they haven't received their medication, they are probably right. they are probably -- they often complaining that they were overcharged and over sentence. they probably right. we refer them as much as we can to those that might be able to help them. from then we begin the triage process to see if there is any kind of assistance once we investigate and if we are able to litigate it. >> thank you. next i would like to ask jim, poor people who are accused of a crime have a right to a public defender but most of the cases are in civil court, child custody, workers right, compensation for catastrophic injuries
university law center and practicing attorney and abc television networks before starting her television career and next is john. i met john about 10 years ago when he was starting off and had this crazy idea of operating a training center for public defenders and he did. he's no now the president and founder and one of the contributors to gideon's army, he's from john marshall law school where he teaches law and criminal procedure. he was in the post katrina and new orleans center. he trained people in the film. he received an advocacy fellowship and named a public interest fellow by harvard law school. next we have maurice call well. he was convicted in the housing project here in san francisco. there was no physical evidence linking him to the crime yet he was still convicted based on the false testimony of a single neighbor. he was sentence to life behind bars. in prison mr. colwell contacted the center for help and located two witnesses who saw the murder and said mr. colwell was not involved in anyway. they located the real killer who confessed and he committed the murder. that m
it will not be too late. myanmar's kevin is due to meet with journalists on saturday to discuss new media laws -- myanmar's government. some say the draft bill could undo the recent reforms. in myanmar is continuing to involve. mainly campaigners for freedom have been released from detention. an increasing number of journalists are on hand to report what they say, free of any prior censorship, but they are worried about proposals for new media laws. they say freedom of speech will be stifled just like it was by the previous military governments. tothis will bring us back square one. it is a made up law, which is intended to renew the 1962 media law. >> for those in the media industry, one of the most worrying aspects is a prison sentence of up to six months for publishers or journalists who break the rules and fail to pay fines. the loosely worded draft legislation would also ban materials that violate the military-backed constitution or right thing that could incite unrest. >> just as there are people for democracy in the forums, there are also people in the government i think who want to cli
's proposition eight. let's start with doma. it's the federal law that defines marriage as a union between and a man and a woman. it keeps gays from get iting th same rights. president clinton signed doma into law in 1996. he now says it should be struck down. avery freedman from cleveland, good to e see you. >> hi, fredricka. >> and richard herman, good to see you as well. avery, you first on this. two cases before the supreme court. let's begin with doma. how much is at stake here? >> i think this is one of the great cases that the the supreme court will hear this term. that and prop eight. but doma which was compromised legislation and signed by bill clinton back in 1996 has always been questionable in terms of constitutionality. and two federal appeals courts have held that that law that restricts personnel rights that is by the federal government violates the constitution. it violates the equal protection law. in terms of the significance of it, it's really march madness. this is so important and so exciting because you have the solicitor general arguing against the constitutionality
it the affordable healthcare act or obama care turned three years old today. while some of the law has already taken effect the price tag hangs in the balance and it is huge by any measure, democrat or republican. with the stroke of a pen on march 23, 2010 after months of bitter debating in congress president obama made it the signature achievement of his first term. it faced numerous appeal attempts and seen a supreme court challenge. john boehner saying when democrats rammed obama care through congress three years ago they did so with a host of promises that are proving more empty by the day. instead of keeping the coverage they have an estimated 7 million americans are at risk of losing health insurance ." then the president marking the day by praising the law saying this in part "the affordable healthcare act will give hard working middle class families the healthcare security they deserve and protect every american from the worst insurance company abuses." all this as preparations continue for a full rollout of the law less than a year from how. molly henneberg live for us in washington. critic
? if you guys get over the racism, it is the law. get over it. the people who killed the people interact, it is the law. -- in iraq. host: what is the affordable care act have to do with racism ? caller: it has a lot to do with racism, taking her -- taking care of people -- we should cut the healthcare for the congress. see how they like it. we will move onto clay in biloxi, mississippi. caller: good morning. disabilityd and on after working 14 years, the five years of court reporting. we had a bombardment of advertisements for simple move -- healthcare for medicare. we find it replaces the medicare policy we currently have. after the deadline passed for the supplements, humana stopped advertising in mississippi. you can't get in touch with humana. the bureaucracy is just going to increase and as leaving the poor tople at a disadvantage correct and try to make reasonable choices for their healthcare. thank you for taking my call. host: a statement put out yesterday by the office of house democratic -- released following the statement today in recognition of the third anniversary of the a
, and the ability to get a job. not just because they are present in violation of the law but because they have a criminal record. this is a recipe for disaster that is irresponsible and unjustified. to make matters worse, many of these individuals lack the money, family, support and the ability to get a job, not just because they are present in violation of the law, but because they have a right -- a criminal record ultimately, the nonsensical action demonstrates the inability and a lack of desire on behalf of the administration to enforce the law, even against illegal immigrants convicted of serious crimes. we learned that 72% of the people released an okra record at all. another 21% had convictions for one or two misdemeanors only. unless to rector martin, who we welcome here today, tells us something different, this means that 93% of the people released by ice were not criminals or low, low level offenders. second, the title of the as for whether this was motivated by policy or politics, from my investigations, i don't believe it was either. i don't believe it was policy because we have no
and though many key parts of the health care law don't go into effect until next year, many americans are already feeling the impact of the changes to the nation's health care system. let's check in now with a checkup on obama care. >> reporter: dueling opinions in washington today on the impact of obama care and whether it's been a boon or a boondoggle to americans and american businesses. obama says it protects americans from insurance companies and says the slaw saving people money. the president said in a statement, millions of americans are saving $600 a year on prescription drugs. millions of young people have beenable to stay on their family's health plan to age 26. preventive care, like mammograms for women and wellness visits for seen, i don't covered free of charge. most importantly, for the sake of our fiscal future, the growth of health care costs is beginning to slow. but the democratic-controlled senate voted early this week to repeal part of obama care, passed with bipartisan support. they repealed a tax on medical devices that would have increased the costs we all pay
challenges for law enforcement as they have no profile and their experiences and motives are also -- are often distinct. for a moment, i would like to discuss the cyber threat, which has evolved over the past decade. cyber criminals have become increasingly adept at exploiting weaknesses in our networks, and once inside, they can infiltrate government and military information, as well as our valuable and -- intellectual property. organized criminal act cyber send the kids and in deal -- ideologically driven activist groups. willieve the cyber threat be cool or eclipse the terrorist threat in the future. we are enhancing our capabilities. we have focused our cyber division on addressing computer intrusions and network attacks. each of our offices have become cyber task forces. we're cloud there -- collaborating and sharing with our federal partners more than ever in the context of a national cyber joint task force, which has 19 military, law- enforcement agencies working together to stop current attacks and prevent them in the future. we also recognize that the private sector is th
choosing boe tech, an east coast consulting firm to help implement the new law legal rising marijuana for the purpose of getting stoned. >> we look forward to working with the board to address the unprecedented challenge of organizing a taxed and regulated market in way that is plekt public health and public safety. >> why did boe tech win? >> they were the highest individual scores in each of the four categories. >> some have called the position the state's drug czar. >> i don't believe that's our official title. >> the competition for the contract was fierce. >> we ended up getting a ton of responses, actually 112 submissions received by the agency, and 95 of those were actual proposals. out of that we had 43 proposals deemed non-responsive. >> wonder why. the pot head consultant bo tech's ceo mark kleinman is already controversial among activists because he expressed concern about state legalization efforts conflicting with federal law. >> we have no idea what the federal government is going to do. if they step in with an injunction, we won't implement based on the dates in 502, bu
, the federal law, the birth of preventative detention which one thought was clearly unconstitutional and then became a public good that changed the whole view of a system. now we live in a justice preemptive justice, but they will commit other crimes in the future. i would say if we all now agree or at least many of us agree with justice kennedy that the result has been a prison system that is barbaric that doesn't belong in a civilized society and serious atonement and i think you would recognize in the california prisons to meet that. let me say why it's a risk. it's always so reasonable to see risk as a way on out of these. i don't think i need to remind those in the room that an entire population were incarcerated for risk. nobody was held accountable for it either. if you look at the way this is a risk, you see racial class is at the end of the day the right kind of community ties and is risk reduction. professor simon, let me ask a follow-up. i want to get an idea of what a system you are advocating would look like. let's say you have arraignment for somebody in a case allegin
by the open records laws, and the sunshine laws and i think in san francisco we haven't talked to the city attorney about that or your counsel about that but the open records laws and sean -- sunshine laws protect them up to appointment so we're not in a situation where every transmission of information is available to the general public. if that is the case or that becomes the case then we change the strategy around a little bit so we can help to protect the identity of the candidates, not necessarily the backgrounds, but the identity of the candidates by still abiding by those laws. >>i think one of the strengths of your team is the tremendous community involvement and searches that you done. i find it interesting to the work you did in l.a. and many nonprofits. my hope is as our diverse communities expect topnotch transportation selection processes like this that we can involve them in as many of the aspects of the profile and the competencies that we can and i welcome a number of stakeholder groups and give you the recommendations as we sit down to one-on-one conversations. >> thank
the top union protests. in michigan, they're mad about a right to work law that starts next week. and in washington, they're mad about all of the automatic spending cuts they say will get worse every week. but with right to work states adding more jobs and with many in the government looking to cut more spending, is it time tore unions to simply get with the program? charles payne, dagen mcdowell, adam lashinsky, charlie gas pregas-- gasperino. >> and with the. >> i love the big raps. >> and communities with fewer presence of unions are doing better communities and businesses. the they drove hostess out of business and they have to figure out the dynamics. they've got to take a step back, we're trying to benefit and not in it for ourselves and the message doesn't get across anymore. >> neil: dagen? >> this is evidence of unions on the run. if you look at michigan, a huge move that that state, kind of the birth of unions as we know it in this country, is now a right to work state, but what you see -- you're starting to see the down and dirty tactics. a lot of unions in that state
outcomes then it's the policy. >> paul: and perez was housing housing law to prosecute banks with this theory. >> that's right. >> paul: and he thought this might be illegal, why? because the disparate is used in some parts, but not in housing. >> it's employment. but they don't have the same language as title vii law and he was afraid at that st. paul would win this case. by the way, st. paul itself said it thought it would win, but dropping the case because it it didn't want to endanger important anti-discrimination work that the justice department was doing. so think about that, you have a senior member of the justice department leaning on other parts of government to withdraw a case, deny the supreme court the ability to rule on this disparate practice under the fair housing act and in the meantime, having the government in the join two cases that could have brought tens of millions of dollars to taxpayers. >> paul: can you believe any case like this, jason, where the official basically got somebody to drop a case the supreme court had already accepted? >> no, no, i can't
bash for obamacare. law turning three years old today. left couldn't be happier. >> it helps us of honor of life, liberty and pursuit of happiness >> eric: a gift now standing 6'7" taller than the president. cashin' in, crashing the party right now. >> eric: i'm eric boling and "cashin' in" crew is with us this. we and welcome everybody. don't crack the bubbly just yet. it's been three years since president obama signed obamacare into law. regulations keep growing and growing. is it starting to get messy. republicans declaring messy that is one of architects saying it himself. >> i think we know it is going to be messy. there will be things that come up that are unanticipated. >> eric: he is right. when we bought the cake. woman said obamacare that is why my hours got cut. i guess we can expect more of that? >> you are going to see a lot more of that. this is direct impact that it is having. we had the legislation and people are trying to read it and get through it. now you see the regulations piling up a and practical day to day coming out in the form of a woman who is trying t
put up. again, we know that these budgets respect going to become law. so, why the exercise? what's the point? >> definitely this broke all records for a vote a rama, what we call these extensive 13-hour-long debates, more than 100 amendments that were considered. but it's -- working the will of the senate, frankly. and it also, one of the things that's key we focus on is some of the amendments that did or didn't pass because they are going to be used in some of these elections in 2014 in terms of the keystone pipeline, for example. that amendment did pass. >> bill, anna brings up a significant point, a lot of folks who have been talking about this idea that the lion's share of what we saw unfold last night over on c-span, a lot of that was designed for campaign ads a lot was just for campaign commercials what does that say about the budget process? >> it is actually moving forward because the democrats have finally said they do support raising tax, only on the wealthy americans but esensely, what's changed, they didn't pass a budget for four years, any budget threat they passed w
to properly implement the laws that we have in place to protect the rights of the people involved. we have, as we noted, a bubble ordinance that has been imposed for quite sometime, and we enacted as a board last year a white zone ordinance which we offer to provide additional protections. unfortunately the laws that we've had in place have not been sufficient to protect the women, especially here. demonstrators continue to not only harass and intimidate, but they try to find loopholes in the existing laws. and what we have right now is a last resort attempt to provide some protection to the patients who want to access this clinic and to the men and women who work there. the ordinance that we have -- we are introducing creates a buffer zone, that it provides protection of 25 radius within the entrance of the clinic. it amends the bubble ordinance that was passed by this board in 1993. that bubble ordinance was a good start, but this is needed. let me say that what we are doing is something that we don't do lightly. we recognize the right of people to express free expression, to express the
and cashin in. >> confetti cake and candles, the birthday bash for obama care t president's health care law turning 3 years old. and the left couldn't be happier. >> it's helped us honor our promise of life, liberty and pursuit of happiness. >> but as democrats party we're unwrapping more costs hidden in the health care law, a gift now standing 67 inches high, taller than the president when you pile on all of the new regulations. cashen in crashing the party right now. >> hello everybody. i'm eric boling. wayne rogers, jonathan and tracy all joining us this week. welcome everybody. don't crack the bubbly yet. it's three years since president obama signed owe bbama care. boy, is it starting to get messy. that's not republicans declaring it messy. that's one of the architects of the law saying it. watch. >> i think we know it's going to be messy. there's going to be things that come up that are unanticipated. >> he's right. we bought this cake the woman there said you know what, obama care, that's why my hours got cut. i guess we can expect more of that. >> you are going to see a lot more of
of the rent control law talks about passing through half and it's kept by the property owner. that's kind of fair to me. i can be convinced otherwise, maybe but i don't think so. i like to share between the tenants and the owners. i recommend a half cost pass through. it will also save buildings -- >> thank you mr. berry. next speaker. >> hi, good afternoon. my name is maria. i work with the cause -- the organization based in san francisco mission district and through our work with our members and clients we see a lot of the buildings are in a need of a lot of repairs including seismic retrofitting. we strongly agree that earthquake safety is necessary in our city and it's great that it's such a priority. unfortunately it should not be done at the expense of tenants especially after a hundred percent pass through. the majority of these buildings are under rent control and probably long-term rent control tenants. so an increase of $80 or more would create a situation where tenants would have to leave their units . we want housing safety and security at all levels, that includes earthquake
. as paul barrett writes in his book, "glock -- the rise of america's gun" shootouts on the set of "law & order" were featuring this austrian import. >> some of the american companies will want to know will our guns be in the hands of good guys or bad guys. glock just said go ahead and put it in the movie. we don't care. >> that's a porcelain gun made in germany. it costs more than you make in a month. >> almost every part of that speech in "die hard 2" is factually wrong, but when there were fears that an undetectable gun could show up in america, sales skyrocketed. barrett said glock saw an opportunity. >> when the law was enacted, it was enacted with a grandfather clause, meaning everything that existed before the day of enactment was still illegal. this left glock with a huge supply of prebanned equipment that was still legal to sell, which the company then dribbled out over time. and the dark glamour of the glock, you know, went up. because gun aficionados resented the resfrings that's the gun they don't want me to have, i want two of them. >> thanks to a perfectly legal trade-in p
're looking forward to that. meanwhile, president obama's health care reform law is turning three today. and the political battles over it continue. two elections later, one supreme court decision, and this week, a rare show of bipartisanship to repeal an unpopular tax in that law. molly henneberg taking a look at that for us, live from washington. hi, molly. >> hi, jamie, that was the medical device tax on everything from latex gloves to wheelchairs to dental instruments and republicans and democrats on capitol hill voted to repeal it, but health insurance industry advocates warned more taxes from this law are coming down the pike. >> the reform law includes a new 100 billion dollar tax on health insurance that starts next year. 2014, 8 billion dollars, average individual will pay $100 more on the premium, and small businesses will pay over $350 for each family they provide coverage for. >> reporter: president obama said in a statement today that obamacare is already saving seniors money on prescription drugs and is slowing the growth of health care costs. and the president also conte
a milestone for the health law. >> remember this, president obama signing the giant piece of legislation into law back in 2010 but any birthday celebrations may be kept low key because the law seems as controversial as ever. now there are new signs that political fight over it could be heating up yet again. molly henneberg is live in washington with more. >> dueling opinions on the impact of obamacare and whether it's been a boon or a boondoggle for americans and americans businesses. president obama says the law protects americans from insurance company abuses and suggests the law is saving people money. president said in a statement, quote, millions of seniors are saving $600 a year on prescription drugs. millions of young people have been able to stay on family's health plan until age 26. mammograms for women and wellness programs for seniors are covered on free of charge. for the fiscal future the growth of healthcare costs is beginning to slow. but they want to repeal part of obamacare. a tax on medical devices that would have increased the costs we pay for things like latex gloves
. >> not saying it should be illegal that have but we should not enshrine in the law of principle a child does not deserve a mother and a father. >> this week the leading group of pediatricians saying there is no evidence that sexual orientation of parents has impact on the child. >> in spite of the fact they face challenges in schools and prejudices from the world those children are still turning out just equally well adjusted and happy, equally successful in school, in life. >> he disagrees saying if high court does legalize gay marriage his fear is that it will end the institution of marriage. >> i fear people will not be interested in marrying anymore. marriage will be irrelevant vent he added the church will suffer. >> if what we're teaching is bigotry and discrimination we're not going to be allowed to do that. >> believing if church teachings are backward it will impact the church-run schools, hopts and service agencies. >> if we want to know how people will be treat swred to think about how a racial bigot is treated in a country today. >> the archbishop admits being a visible opponent
the permits. while it may not be a form law retail the board can consider the arguments made by the neighbors but i would suggest that is the permit that would be on appeal to the board on may 15th, which deals with the actual change of use and the establishment of an oska at that location. additionally, if somehow, they open additional stores such that they have eleven stores operating the day that this comes before the board, then they would be considered formula retail use, the board would apply the law of the day and would i believe, deny the permit because it would not have it would be a formula retail use and not have the appropriate lease authorization and the board has to apply the law of the day when you hear the permit that is before you. so, but it does not sound like that is a possibility given that they don't have enough stores in the pipeline to trigger the threshold in the next couple of months. because of that we found that it is not formula retail. and available for any questions. >> i have a quick question on the pop up stores. what do those count as? >> those are generally
dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. and make your business dream a reality. but that doesn't mean i don't want to make money.stor. i love making money. i try to be smart with my investments. i also try to keep my costs down. what's your plan? ishares. low cost and tax efficient. find out why nine out of ten large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> this morning my question. what are 30,000 students in chicago supposed to do now? plus, obama care three years later. and the secretly recorded nypd stop and frisk bombshell. but first, this is not a test. we are experiencing a serious uterus emergency. ♪ good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. ladies, it is time to gird your loins again. remember that hibt that we dropped to the national republican lawmakers on election day, the one that responded to their attempts to man handl
. polls show that egyptians, 75% of them, wanted sharia law. this was totally predictable. >> if you look at the muslim nations, they are not familiar with any of the law. the only law that works with them is sharia law. >> women can't drive, women can't go to school in saudi arabia, in iran, where else do you want to go? >> it's not the universal but it's the law of saudi and iran. >> it is islamist law,. i didn't mean to interprupt rupt. >> sean: eyewitness for rape? >> it's to prevent people charged wrongly and witnesses if they ever lie, they are going to be punished severely. >> sean: how about a dna test, we can prove it immediately. it was. >> killings, the fact that you are saying the reason for the number of centuries go it's still being used to today the only freedom of revolution was in june and july of 2009 because iranians were living under the boots. they booted sharia and obama could have been a historical figure. they are agitating in many countries. you could change the course of human events. >> sean: they are fighting proxy wars. >> so, it's the sharia not to criticize
. >> switching gears a milestone for the health care overhaul. president obama signed into law three years ago today. controversy over the giant piece of legislation has just not gone away. americans are still trying to figure out all the fine print and what it will cost them. on top of this, there are new signs the political fight over it could be heating up again. molly henneberg is live in washington with more. hi, molly. >> hi. just this week, republicans and democrats on capitol hill voted to repeal an unpopular obamacare tax, the medical device tax on everything from latex gloves to wheelchairs to dentsal instruments. but health insurance industry advocates warn more taxes from this law are coming down the pike. >> the reform law includes a new $100 billion tax in health insurance that starts next year. 2014 will be $8 billion. that's going to mean an average will pay $100 more on a premium as a result of this tax alone. small businesses will pay over $350 for each family they provide coverage for. >> president obama said in a statement today that obamacare is already saving seniors mone
that mon crow wrote to her sons-in-laws that talk about family matters. congressmen wrote letters home talking about meeting ms monroe. other women in washington recorded in their diaries about meeting her but we don't have anything from her point of view which is madening. >> what do we know about her relationship with her husband? >> they were absolutely devoted. they were apart for a couple of months here and there throughout their 44 year marriage but usually they were together. there say wonderful letter speaking of congressmen, congressman from new york wrote his wife that he had been at a dinner at the white house when jefferson was president and it was right before monroe went to france to negotiate the louisiana purchase and mitchell wrote to his wife saying monroe has a fine conjugal feeling. he can't stand to be separated from his wife so he's taking her with him to europe. he was devoted to family as well. asia said before that's really what they wanted to do. if they had their choice of how they would spend time, it would be with their family. >> this program is interactiv
by law enforcement. you mentioned that people think you are crazy if you are for jones. but what about the privacy base? think about it. police five helicopters over your house now. they have cameras. do you have a problem with that? they are useful and valuable as a law enforcement tool they can help look for lost people and bad guys and their quick on their response. the fuel and maintenance costs is low than the cost of a helicopter. as a pilot, i want them flown on the under the watchful eye of the faa. but let's help law enforcement do a better job of keeping our neighborhoods safe. melissa: thank you, tom. be sure to catch it at seven and 10:00 p.m. on saturday and sunday, the tom sullivan show. i will be a guest this weekend. happy friday and thank you for joining us. have a great cruise. [lghter] anythingo help. good night. >> more than 1,000 students have gathered to steady liberty should even be in college? if they work as interns are they exploited? if they are illegal should it be a quicker path to citizenship? wh should the rules be? >> a trip back to college. tonight. [ap
with the realtor association to make sure that disclosure laws adequately cover this and make sure that people buying and selling these buildings are fully aware of the ordinance requirements and myself and the city staff is here to answer any questions that may come up. thank you. >> thank you, mr. leaney. >> so mr. egan, do you want to present? >> thank you supervisors. control economic developments. our office issued an economic report on this. i will make 3 points about it. first of all, like many forms of legislation it has cost and benefits as the supervisors have mentioned the benefits of this legislation are highly sensitive to the probability of an earthquake. those benefits include future repair cost as has been mentioned for people to be able to stay in their home after an event. certainly improved life safety. these benefits are highly sensitive to earthquake probabilities and based on the numbers from usgs, the most recent numbers we estimate there is about a 2 percent chance of an earthquake and the 2 percent probability alone would justify this immediate spent you sped expendi
to reclassifying the property as a higher tax rate that states law allows you to do that as retrofit. additionally we are looking into the loan process and these buildings maybe historic and landmarks. it would require a vote. with the mellow roos, they effectively become the voting body so they get to decide between the group when money is build out for these i am improvements that is repaid for their property taxes and gives them the mechanism without taking a loan individually. that is an interesting feature of it. if these properties change hands. the loan actually goes with it and the person who originated the loan is relieved from the debt. >> then in terms of the actual work that's being done, there was reference made before which is issued that i have been thinking about. in terms of making sure that the process for property openers owners who are complying with the law and somehow got financing and want to do the work and have to get to the planning department and planning of building inspection. what is your competence level that will our policy intent to expedited this process to make
is that congress passed a law last year. that was for broadband purposes. trying to analyze it for purposes of putting together what would quite literally be the most complex spectrum auction in history. i know that sounds like a hyperbole, but it is true. i have expressed caution. i am not doom and gloom, but cautious in terms of when that will happen and how it will happen. i'm not sure we will yield as much spectrum is first advertised. 120 mega hurtz. then that was pared back because people forgot about border interference with tv stations. 60 mega hurtz. there is a potential for channel sharing. that would take a lot of broadcasters in these markets. it is complex. we need to be careful. there are a lot of different parts are. there does not seem to be a lot of agreement among the parties. are thee segments reverse auction, how cheaply abroad caster gives up -- broadcaster gives up -- money would go to the treasury and help fund the wireless network. there is the repacking aspect. for broadcasters to stay on the air, where would they be located on the dial? where would the wireless bro
is to teach the truths of our faith and the truths of the natural moral law and whatever challenges that entails i embrace with enthusiasm. we can learn to respect each other across differences and even to love one another end quote. >>> one of the most notable men in the gay community and he is also the first of his kind. how he changed the sports world on and off the court. a revealing interview with the president of the golden state warriors. >>> winter may be over but it is still fresh in the mind of wine makers. >>> and public support for gun reform might be picking up steam but democratic leadership has definitely hit a snag. we take a look at whether harry reid and colleagues have broken a promise when it comes to overhauling gun laws. >>> there is a good chance you haven't heard of them but you have heard of the organization he runs. the team president of the warriors is a major player in the world of basketball but his legacy is in the gay community. ehe came out almost two years ago. does he regret it? tonight the interview. >> reporter: what you see in a warriors game isn
to become law. anything they put in that bill is going to become law. the budget is a resolution. it's not binding. it is likely going to head to conference with the house republicans but even then some of the little things we saw like a vote yesterday in the senate to repeal the medical device tax in obama care, not going to be binding. so even though they took dozens and dozens, they considered more than a hundred amendments in the last 24 hours, none of those will have effect. t was mostly symbolic. host: we go to james. caller: everybody is complaining about government shutdown and all the situations we are dealing with. i want to ask the question why isn't anybody going back to the root of this situation when we got into this with president bush with illegal war. now president obama is bringing the soldiers back and the war is over. where are the funds from that to be utilized back into society and all the oil we got from you is dam hugh sane. why isn't going back to the fact the reason we got into this is what happened with bush and his administration and obama had to pull us o
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